Goosegrass

(Eleusine indica)


Family: Poaceae


Also Known As:



Weed Photos: Courtesy of Dr. Lambert McCartey. Clemson University. Clemson, SC.

                



Description


Goosegrass is a prostrate-growing summer annual. The leaves are folded in the bud. Goosegrass grows in a clump with the base of the leaves being distinctively white to silver in color. The ligule is toothed, membranous, and divided at the center. Goosegrass contains hairs only at the base of the leaf. Goosegrass seedheads contain 3 -7 spikes that form at the tip of the seed stalk. The seeds are attached in a zipper appearance on the spike. Goosegrass spreads by seeds that germinate later in the season than other annual grasses. Goosegrass seedheads contain 3 -7 spikes that form at the tip of the seed stalk. The seeds are attached in a zipper appearance on the spike. Goosegrass spreads by seeds that germinate later in the season than other annual grasses. Goosegrass is found in the United States from the transition zone south.




Distribution





Germination Dates



3: July
4: July
5: June-July
6: June-July
7: June-July
8: May-June
9: May-June





Cultural Practices

Goosegrass is highly competitive during hot summers, and can out-compete desirable grasses where soil is compacted. Core aeration should be provided to improve soil conditions for desirable grasses. Single plants can be physically removed with a knife. Do not seed when soil and weather conditions are appropriate for the germination of goosegrass (60 to 65 degrees F). A slightly raised mowing height may help prevent its establishment by providing shade from sunlight.




Herbicide Use

Make a properly timed pre-emergence application, generally within two weeks after soil temperatures have reached a consistent 55 degrees F. After germination, use a post-emergent herbicide prior to tillering.




Look Alikes